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Honda CD125TC Benly


The Honda CD125TC Benly is a 124 cc (7.6 cu in), air-cooled, four stroke, twin cylinder "commuter" style motorcycle manufactured by the Honda Motor Company between 1982 and 1985 for the United Kingdom. Its engine size and power output were designed to conform to provisional licence restrictions of the time and it was a version of the Honda CD200 Benly introduced in the late 1970s, with the same four speed constant mesh transmission (as the 200) but electric start only. The machine was identical in all other respects apart from the engine barrel size. It was equipped with an enclosed chain and capacitor discharge electronic ignition. Brakes were drum front and rear and it had both centre and side stands. Electrics were 12 volt, and the battery was housed in the right hand, side panel. The left hand panel contained a small toolkit. Instrumentation was by way of two handlebar mounted binnacles. One contained a speedometer, with odometer and trip meter and was in miles per hour with markings for kilometres and maximum speeds in gears. The other contained warning lights for main beam, ignition/neutral and indicators.

 

The Honda Super Cub is a Honda underbone motorcycle with a four stroke single cylinder engine ranging in displacement from 49 to 109 cc (3.0 to 6.7 cu in).

In continuous manufacture since 1958 with production surpassing 60 million in 2008, and 87 million in 2014, the Super Cub is the most produced motor vehicle* in history.Variants include the C100, C50, C70, C90, C100EX and C70 Passport.

The Super Cub's US advertising campaign, You meet the nicest people on a Honda, had a lasting impact on Honda's image and on American attitudes to motorcycling, and is often used as a marketing case study.

The idea for a new 50-cubic-centimetre (3.1 cu in) motorcycle was conceived in 1956, when Honda Motor's Soichiro Honda and Takeo Fujisawa toured Germany and witnessed the popularity of mopeds and lightweight motorcycles. Soichiro Honda was primarily the engineering and production leader of the company, always with an eye towards winning on the racetrack, while his close partner Fujisawa was the man of finance and business, heading up sales and formulating strategies intended to dominate markets and utterly destroy Honda Motor's competitors. Fujisawa had been thinking about a long term expansion strategy, and unlike other Japanese companies, they did not want to simply boost production to cash in on the recent economic boom in Japan. A small, high performance motorcycle was central to his plans. Upwardly mobile consumers in postwar Europe typically went from a bicycle to a clip on engine, then bought a scooter, then a bubble car, and then a small car and onwards. Fujisawa saw that a motorcycle did not fit in this pattern for the average person, and he saw an opportunity to change that. Soichiro Honda was at the time tired of listening to Fujisawa talk about his new motorcycle idea; Honda came to Europe to win the Isle of Man TT race and wanted to think about little else.

1954 Kreidler K50
Fujisawa and Honda visited Kreidler and Lambretta showrooms, as well as others, researching the kind of motorcycle Fujisawa had in mind. Fujisawa said the designs had "no future" and would not sell well. His concept was a two wheeler for everyman, one that would appeal to both developed and developing countries, urban and rural. The new motorcycle needed to be technologically simple to survive in places without up to date know how and access to advanced tools or reliable spare parts supplies. The common consumer complaints of noise, poor reliability, especially in the electrics, and general difficulty of use would have to be addressed. Because Honda was a large company growing larger, it needed a mass appeal product that could be produced on an enormous scale. The design had to be sorted out before production began, because it would be too costly to fix problems in the vast numbers that were to be manufactured. The scooter type nearly fitted the bill, but was too complex for developing countries to maintain, and the small wheels did poorly on badly maintained or nonexistent roads. Another of Fujusawa's requirements was that it could be ridden with one hand while carrying a tray of soba noodles, saying to Honda, "If you can design a small motorcycle, say 50 cc with a cover to hide the engine and hoses and wires inside, I can sell it. I don't know how many soba noodle shops there are in Japan, but I bet you that every shop will want one for deliveries."

Once interested, Soichiro Honda began developing the Super Cub on his return to Japan. The following year Honda displayed a mockup to Fujisawa that finally matched what he had in mind, Fujisawa declaring the annual sales would be 30,000 per month, half again as many as the entire monthly two-wheeler market in Japan. His goal was to export motorcycles on a scale yet unseen in the economic disorder of postwar Japan, when most companies' halting trade efforts were handled through foreign trading companies. Honda would have to establish its own overseas subsidiary to provide the necessary service and spare parts distribution in a large country like the United States. To this end American Honda Motor Company was founded in 1959. In 1961 a sales network was established in Germany, then in Belgium and the UK in 1962, and then France in 1964.

The Honda Juno had been the first scooter to use polyester resin, or fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP), bodywork, and even though production of the Juno had stopped in 1954 as a result of Honda Motor's financial and labor problems at the time, Fujisawa continued to encourage research in polyester resin casting techniques, and these efforts bore fruit for the Super Cub. The new motorcycle's fairing would be polyethylene, the most widely used plastic, which reduced weight over FRP, but Honda's supplier had never made such a large die cast before, so the die had to be provided by Honda. The Super Cub was the first motorcycle ever to use a plastic fairing. Motorcycling historian Clement Salvadori wrote that the plastic front fender and leg shields were, "perhaps the Cub's greatest contribution; plastic did the job just as well as metal at considerably lower cost." The technology developed in the Isle of Man TT racing program was equally vital to the new lightweight motorcycle, making possible 3.4 kilowatts (4.5 hp) from a 50 cc four-stroke Honda engine, where the first engine the company built a decade earlier, a "fairly exact copy" of the 50 cc two stroke war-surplus Tohatsu engine Honda had been selling as motorized bicycle auxiliary engine, had only a 0.37–0.75 kilowatts (0.5–1 hp) output. Honda's first four stroke, the 1951 E-type, had just a little more power than the Super Cub, 3.7 kilowatts (5 bhp), with nearly triple the displacement, 146 cc (8.9 cu in).

To make the new motorcycle, Honda built a new ¥10 billion factory in Suzuka, Mie to manufacture 30,000, and with two shifts, 50,000, Super Cubs per month. The factory was modeled on the Volkswagen Beetle production line in Wolfsburg, Germany. Until then, Honda's top models had sold only 2,000 to 3,000 per month, and observers thought the cost of the new plant too risky an expenditure. Edward Turner of BSA went to Japan to see the motorcycle industry in September 1960, and said that investments the size of the Suzuka plant were "extremely dangerous" because the US motorcycle market was already saturated. When completed in 1960, the Suzuka Factory was the largest motorcycle factory in the world, and was a model for Honda's mass production facilities of the future. The economies of scale achieved at Suzuka cut 18% from the cost of producing each Super Cub when Suzuka could be run at full capacity, but in the short term Honda faced excess inventory problems when the new factory went into operation before the full sales and distribution network was in place.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honda_Super_Cub

The Honda Super Cub is a Honda underbone motorcycle with a four stroke single cylinder engine ranging in displacement from 49 to 109 cc (3.0 to 6.7 cu in).

In continuous manufacture since 1958 with production surpassing 60 million in 2008, and 87 million in 2014, the Super Cub is the most produced motor vehicle* in history.Variants include the C100, C50, C70, C90, C100EX and C70 Passport.

The Super Cub's US advertising campaign, You meet the nicest people on a Honda, had a lasting impact on Honda's image and on American attitudes to motorcycling, and is often used as a marketing case study.

The idea for a new 50-cubic-centimetre (3.1 cu in) motorcycle was conceived in 1956, when Honda Motor's Soichiro Honda and Takeo Fujisawa toured Germany and witnessed the popularity of mopeds and lightweight motorcycles. Soichiro Honda was primarily the engineering and production leader of the company, always with an eye towards winning on the racetrack, while his close partner Fujisawa was the man of finance and business, heading up sales and formulating strategies intended to dominate markets and utterly destroy Honda Motor's competitors. Fujisawa had been thinking about a long term expansion strategy, and unlike other Japanese companies, they did not want to simply boost production to cash in on the recent economic boom in Japan. A small, high performance motorcycle was central to his plans. Upwardly mobile consumers in postwar Europe typically went from a bicycle to a clip on engine, then bought a scooter, then a bubble car, and then a small car and onwards. Fujisawa saw that a motorcycle did not fit in this pattern for the average person, and he saw an opportunity to change that. Soichiro Honda was at the time tired of listening to Fujisawa talk about his new motorcycle idea; Honda came to Europe to win the Isle of Man TT race and wanted to think about little else.

1954 Kreidler K50
Fujisawa and Honda visited Kreidler and Lambretta showrooms, as well as others, researching the kind of motorcycle Fujisawa had in mind. Fujisawa said the designs had "no future" and would not sell well. His concept was a two wheeler for everyman, one that would appeal to both developed and developing countries, urban and rural. The new motorcycle needed to be technologically simple to survive in places without up to date know how and access to advanced tools or reliable spare parts supplies. The common consumer complaints of noise, poor reliability, especially in the electrics, and general difficulty of use would have to be addressed. Because Honda was a large company growing larger, it needed a mass appeal product that could be produced on an enormous scale. The design had to be sorted out before production began, because it would be too costly to fix problems in the vast numbers that were to be manufactured. The scooter type nearly fitted the bill, but was too complex for developing countries to maintain, and the small wheels did poorly on badly maintained or nonexistent roads. Another of Fujusawa's requirements was that it could be ridden with one hand while carrying a tray of soba noodles, saying to Honda, "If you can design a small motorcycle, say 50 cc with a cover to hide the engine and hoses and wires inside, I can sell it. I don't know how many soba noodle shops there are in Japan, but I bet you that every shop will want one for deliveries."

Once interested, Soichiro Honda began developing the Super Cub on his return to Japan. The following year Honda displayed a mockup to Fujisawa that finally matched what he had in mind, Fujisawa declaring the annual sales would be 30,000 per month, half again as many as the entire monthly two-wheeler market in Japan. His goal was to export motorcycles on a scale yet unseen in the economic disorder of postwar Japan, when most companies' halting trade efforts were handled through foreign trading companies. Honda would have to establish its own overseas subsidiary to provide the necessary service and spare parts distribution in a large country like the United States. To this end American Honda Motor Company was founded in 1959. In 1961 a sales network was established in Germany, then in Belgium and the UK in 1962, and then France in 1964.

The Honda Juno had been the first scooter to use polyester resin, or fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP), bodywork, and even though production of the Juno had stopped in 1954 as a result of Honda Motor's financial and labor problems at the time, Fujisawa continued to encourage research in polyester resin casting techniques, and these efforts bore fruit for the Super Cub. The new motorcycle's fairing would be polyethylene, the most widely used plastic, which reduced weight over FRP, but Honda's supplier had never made such a large die cast before, so the die had to be provided by Honda. The Super Cub was the first motorcycle ever to use a plastic fairing. Motorcycling historian Clement Salvadori wrote that the plastic front fender and leg shields were, "perhaps the Cub's greatest contribution; plastic did the job just as well as metal at considerably lower cost." The technology developed in the Isle of Man TT racing program was equally vital to the new lightweight motorcycle, making possible 3.4 kilowatts (4.5 hp) from a 50 cc four-stroke Honda engine, where the first engine the company built a decade earlier, a "fairly exact copy" of the 50 cc two stroke war-surplus Tohatsu engine Honda had been selling as motorized bicycle auxiliary engine, had only a 0.37–0.75 kilowatts (0.5–1 hp) output. Honda's first four stroke, the 1951 E-type, had just a little more power than the Super Cub, 3.7 kilowatts (5 bhp), with nearly triple the displacement, 146 cc (8.9 cu in).

To make the new motorcycle, Honda built a new ¥10 billion factory in Suzuka, Mie to manufacture 30,000, and with two shifts, 50,000, Super Cubs per month. The factory was modeled on the Volkswagen Beetle production line in Wolfsburg, Germany. Until then, Honda's top models had sold only 2,000 to 3,000 per month, and observers thought the cost of the new plant too risky an expenditure. Edward Turner of BSA went to Japan to see the motorcycle industry in September 1960, and said that investments the size of the Suzuka plant were "extremely dangerous" because the US motorcycle market was already saturated. When completed in 1960, the Suzuka Factory was the largest motorcycle factory in the world, and was a model for Honda's mass production facilities of the future. The economies of scale achieved at Suzuka cut 18% from the cost of producing each Super Cub when Suzuka could be run at full capacity, but in the short term Honda faced excess inventory problems when the new factory went into operation before the full sales and distribution network was in place.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honda_Super_Cub

The Honda Super Cub is a Honda underbone motorcycle with a four stroke single cylinder engine ranging in displacement from 49 to 109 cc (3.0 to 6.7 cu in).

In continuous manufacture since 1958 with production surpassing 60 million in 2008, and 87 million in 2014, the Super Cub is the most produced motor vehicle* in history.Variants include the C100, C50, C70, C90, C100EX and C70 Passport.

The Super Cub's US advertising campaign, You meet the nicest people on a Honda, had a lasting impact on Honda's image and on American attitudes to motorcycling, and is often used as a marketing case study.

The idea for a new 50-cubic-centimetre (3.1 cu in) motorcycle was conceived in 1956, when Honda Motor's Soichiro Honda and Takeo Fujisawa toured Germany and witnessed the popularity of mopeds and lightweight motorcycles. Soichiro Honda was primarily the engineering and production leader of the company, always with an eye towards winning on the racetrack, while his close partner Fujisawa was the man of finance and business, heading up sales and formulating strategies intended to dominate markets and utterly destroy Honda Motor's competitors. Fujisawa had been thinking about a long term expansion strategy, and unlike other Japanese companies, they did not want to simply boost production to cash in on the recent economic boom in Japan. A small, high performance motorcycle was central to his plans. Upwardly mobile consumers in postwar Europe typically went from a bicycle to a clip on engine, then bought a scooter, then a bubble car, and then a small car and onwards. Fujisawa saw that a motorcycle did not fit in this pattern for the average person, and he saw an opportunity to change that. Soichiro Honda was at the time tired of listening to Fujisawa talk about his new motorcycle idea; Honda came to Europe to win the Isle of Man TT race and wanted to think about little else.

1954 Kreidler K50
Fujisawa and Honda visited Kreidler and Lambretta showrooms, as well as others, researching the kind of motorcycle Fujisawa had in mind. Fujisawa said the designs had "no future" and would not sell well. His concept was a two wheeler for everyman, one that would appeal to both developed and developing countries, urban and rural. The new motorcycle needed to be technologically simple to survive in places without up to date know how and access to advanced tools or reliable spare parts supplies. The common consumer complaints of noise, poor reliability, especially in the electrics, and general difficulty of use would have to be addressed. Because Honda was a large company growing larger, it needed a mass appeal product that could be produced on an enormous scale. The design had to be sorted out before production began, because it would be too costly to fix problems in the vast numbers that were to be manufactured. The scooter type nearly fitted the bill, but was too complex for developing countries to maintain, and the small wheels did poorly on badly maintained or nonexistent roads. Another of Fujusawa's requirements was that it could be ridden with one hand while carrying a tray of soba noodles, saying to Honda, "If you can design a small motorcycle, say 50 cc with a cover to hide the engine and hoses and wires inside, I can sell it. I don't know how many soba noodle shops there are in Japan, but I bet you that every shop will want one for deliveries."

Once interested, Soichiro Honda began developing the Super Cub on his return to Japan. The following year Honda displayed a mockup to Fujisawa that finally matched what he had in mind, Fujisawa declaring the annual sales would be 30,000 per month, half again as many as the entire monthly two-wheeler market in Japan. His goal was to export motorcycles on a scale yet unseen in the economic disorder of postwar Japan, when most companies' halting trade efforts were handled through foreign trading companies. Honda would have to establish its own overseas subsidiary to provide the necessary service and spare parts distribution in a large country like the United States. To this end American Honda Motor Company was founded in 1959. In 1961 a sales network was established in Germany, then in Belgium and the UK in 1962, and then France in 1964.

The Honda Juno had been the first scooter to use polyester resin, or fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP), bodywork, and even though production of the Juno had stopped in 1954 as a result of Honda Motor's financial and labor problems at the time, Fujisawa continued to encourage research in polyester resin casting techniques, and these efforts bore fruit for the Super Cub. The new motorcycle's fairing would be polyethylene, the most widely used plastic, which reduced weight over FRP, but Honda's supplier had never made such a large die cast before, so the die had to be provided by Honda. The Super Cub was the first motorcycle ever to use a plastic fairing. Motorcycling historian Clement Salvadori wrote that the plastic front fender and leg shields were, "perhaps the Cub's greatest contribution; plastic did the job just as well as metal at considerably lower cost." The technology developed in the Isle of Man TT racing program was equally vital to the new lightweight motorcycle, making possible 3.4 kilowatts (4.5 hp) from a 50 cc four-stroke Honda engine, where the first engine the company built a decade earlier, a "fairly exact copy" of the 50 cc two stroke war-surplus Tohatsu engine Honda had been selling as motorized bicycle auxiliary engine, had only a 0.37–0.75 kilowatts (0.5–1 hp) output. Honda's first four stroke, the 1951 E-type, had just a little more power than the Super Cub, 3.7 kilowatts (5 bhp), with nearly triple the displacement, 146 cc (8.9 cu in).

To make the new motorcycle, Honda built a new ¥10 billion factory in Suzuka, Mie to manufacture 30,000, and with two shifts, 50,000, Super Cubs per month. The factory was modeled on the Volkswagen Beetle production line in Wolfsburg, Germany. Until then, Honda's top models had sold only 2,000 to 3,000 per month, and observers thought the cost of the new plant too risky an expenditure. Edward Turner of BSA went to Japan to see the motorcycle industry in September 1960, and said that investments the size of the Suzuka plant were "extremely dangerous" because the US motorcycle market was already saturated. When completed in 1960, the Suzuka Factory was the largest motorcycle factory in the world, and was a model for Honda's mass production facilities of the future. The economies of scale achieved at Suzuka cut 18% from the cost of producing each Super Cub when Suzuka could be run at full capacity, but in the short term Honda faced excess inventory problems when the new factory went into operation before the full sales and distribution network was in place.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honda_Super_Cub

The Honda Super Cub, in modelsheet the C100, is a Honda underbone motorcycle with a four stroke single cylinder engine ranging in displacement from 49 to 109 cc (3.0 to 6.7 cu in). Having been in continuous manufacture since 1958, with production surpassing 60 million in 2008, the Super Cub is the most produced motor vehicle in history. The Super Cub's US advertising campaign, "You meet the nicest people on a Honda", had a lasting impact on Honda's image and on American attitudes about motorcycling, and is considered a classic case study in marketing. The Super Cub has been compared to the Ford Model T, Volkswagen Beetle and the Jeep as an icon of 20th century industry and transport. The C100 used a pressed steel monocoque chassis, with the horizontal engine placed below the central spine, a configuration now called the 'step through' or 'underbone' motorcycle. By some criteria, the type of motorcycle the Super Cub falls into is difficult to classify, landing somewhere between a scooter and a motorcycle, and sometimes it was called a moped, "step-thru", or scooterette. A plastic fairing ran from below the handlebars and under the footpegs, protecting the rider's legs from wind and road debris, as well as hiding the engine from view. This design was like the full enclosure of a scooter, but unlike a scooter the engine and gearbox unit was not fixed to the rear axle. This had several benefits. It moved the engine down and away from the seat, detaching the rear swingarm motion from the drivetrain for lower unsprung weight, and also made engine cooling air flow more direct, and it made possible larger wheels. Placing the engine in the center of the frame, rather than close to the rear wheel, gave it proper front-rear balance. The fuel tank was located under the hinged seat, which opened to reveal the fuel filler inlet. The 17 inch wheels, in comparison to the typical 10 inch wheels of a scooter, were more stable, particularly on rough roads, and psychologically made the motorcycle more familiar, having an appearance closer to a bicycle than a small-wheel scooter.

The Honda Super Cub is a Honda underbone motorcycle with a four stroke single cylinder engine ranging in displacement from 49 to 109 cc (3.0 to 6.7 cu in).

In continuous manufacture since 1958 with production surpassing 60 million in 2008, and 87 million in 2014, the Super Cub is the most produced motor vehicle* in history.Variants include the C100, C50, C70, C90, C100EX and C70 Passport.

The Super Cub's US advertising campaign, You meet the nicest people on a Honda, had a lasting impact on Honda's image and on American attitudes to motorcycling, and is often used as a marketing case study.

The idea for a new 50-cubic-centimetre (3.1 cu in) motorcycle was conceived in 1956, when Honda Motor's Soichiro Honda and Takeo Fujisawa toured Germany and witnessed the popularity of mopeds and lightweight motorcycles. Soichiro Honda was primarily the engineering and production leader of the company, always with an eye towards winning on the racetrack, while his close partner Fujisawa was the man of finance and business, heading up sales and formulating strategies intended to dominate markets and utterly destroy Honda Motor's competitors. Fujisawa had been thinking about a long term expansion strategy, and unlike other Japanese companies, they did not want to simply boost production to cash in on the recent economic boom in Japan. A small, high performance motorcycle was central to his plans. Upwardly mobile consumers in postwar Europe typically went from a bicycle to a clip on engine, then bought a scooter, then a bubble car, and then a small car and onwards. Fujisawa saw that a motorcycle did not fit in this pattern for the average person, and he saw an opportunity to change that. Soichiro Honda was at the time tired of listening to Fujisawa talk about his new motorcycle idea; Honda came to Europe to win the Isle of Man TT race and wanted to think about little else.

1954 Kreidler K50
Fujisawa and Honda visited Kreidler and Lambretta showrooms, as well as others, researching the kind of motorcycle Fujisawa had in mind. Fujisawa said the designs had "no future" and would not sell well. His concept was a two wheeler for everyman, one that would appeal to both developed and developing countries, urban and rural. The new motorcycle needed to be technologically simple to survive in places without up to date know how and access to advanced tools or reliable spare parts supplies. The common consumer complaints of noise, poor reliability, especially in the electrics, and general difficulty of use would have to be addressed. Because Honda was a large company growing larger, it needed a mass appeal product that could be produced on an enormous scale. The design had to be sorted out before production began, because it would be too costly to fix problems in the vast numbers that were to be manufactured. The scooter type nearly fitted the bill, but was too complex for developing countries to maintain, and the small wheels did poorly on badly maintained or nonexistent roads. Another of Fujusawa's requirements was that it could be ridden with one hand while carrying a tray of soba noodles, saying to Honda, "If you can design a small motorcycle, say 50 cc with a cover to hide the engine and hoses and wires inside, I can sell it. I don't know how many soba noodle shops there are in Japan, but I bet you that every shop will want one for deliveries."

Once interested, Soichiro Honda began developing the Super Cub on his return to Japan. The following year Honda displayed a mockup to Fujisawa that finally matched what he had in mind, Fujisawa declaring the annual sales would be 30,000 per month, half again as many as the entire monthly two-wheeler market in Japan. His goal was to export motorcycles on a scale yet unseen in the economic disorder of postwar Japan, when most companies' halting trade efforts were handled through foreign trading companies. Honda would have to establish its own overseas subsidiary to provide the necessary service and spare parts distribution in a large country like the United States. To this end American Honda Motor Company was founded in 1959. In 1961 a sales network was established in Germany, then in Belgium and the UK in 1962, and then France in 1964.

The Honda Juno had been the first scooter to use polyester resin, or fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP), bodywork, and even though production of the Juno had stopped in 1954 as a result of Honda Motor's financial and labor problems at the time, Fujisawa continued to encourage research in polyester resin casting techniques, and these efforts bore fruit for the Super Cub. The new motorcycle's fairing would be polyethylene, the most widely used plastic, which reduced weight over FRP, but Honda's supplier had never made such a large die cast before, so the die had to be provided by Honda. The Super Cub was the first motorcycle ever to use a plastic fairing. Motorcycling historian Clement Salvadori wrote that the plastic front fender and leg shields were, "perhaps the Cub's greatest contribution; plastic did the job just as well as metal at considerably lower cost." The technology developed in the Isle of Man TT racing program was equally vital to the new lightweight motorcycle, making possible 3.4 kilowatts (4.5 hp) from a 50 cc four-stroke Honda engine, where the first engine the company built a decade earlier, a "fairly exact copy" of the 50 cc two stroke war-surplus Tohatsu engine Honda had been selling as motorized bicycle auxiliary engine, had only a 0.37–0.75 kilowatts (0.5–1 hp) output. Honda's first four stroke, the 1951 E-type, had just a little more power than the Super Cub, 3.7 kilowatts (5 bhp), with nearly triple the displacement, 146 cc (8.9 cu in).

To make the new motorcycle, Honda built a new ¥10 billion factory in Suzuka, Mie to manufacture 30,000, and with two shifts, 50,000, Super Cubs per month. The factory was modeled on the Volkswagen Beetle production line in Wolfsburg, Germany. Until then, Honda's top models had sold only 2,000 to 3,000 per month, and observers thought the cost of the new plant too risky an expenditure. Edward Turner of BSA went to Japan to see the motorcycle industry in September 1960, and said that investments the size of the Suzuka plant were "extremely dangerous" because the US motorcycle market was already saturated. When completed in 1960, the Suzuka Factory was the largest motorcycle factory in the world, and was a model for Honda's mass production facilities of the future. The economies of scale achieved at Suzuka cut 18% from the cost of producing each Super Cub when Suzuka could be run at full capacity, but in the short term Honda faced excess inventory problems when the new factory went into operation before the full sales and distribution network was in place.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honda_Super_Cub

The ATC250R is a high-performance ATV produced by Honda from 1981 to 1986. Early models (1981-1984) used an air-cooled, 248 cc single-cylinder two-stroke engine. Fuel was fed through a 27 mm (1981-1982) or 30 mm (1983-1984) round-slide carburetor. Power was accessed through a close-ratio five-speed transmission with a manual clutch. Later models (1985-1986) used a liquid-cooled, 246 cc single-cylinder two-stroke engine with a 34 mm round (1985) or flat (1986) slide carburetor. The biggest engine downfall was the lack of a power valve. The 85-86 models were upgraded with a close-ratio six speed transmission again with a manual clutch.

All model years were fully suspended and adjustable, using air-assisted front forks and a single, remote reservoir gas-charged rear shock. 1981-1982 models offered 6.7 inches of front suspension travel and 4.3 inches in the rear, 1983-1984 offered 8.7 inches in front and 8.1 inches rear, while 1985-1986 gave 9.8 inches of travel. All model years also used a gear-driven counter-balancer to reduce engine vibration. Dual disc brakes were used on all model years, with the exception of the 1981, which used a front disc and a rear drum.

The 1981 ATC250R marked a milestone in off-road history, as it was the first two-stroke ATV designed specifically for racing. While ATV racing was in its infancy, racers had to rely on Honda's ATC110 and ATC185 models on the racetrack. Both of these four-stroke models were sluggish and poorly suspended when compared to the 2-stroke ATC250R.

The 1983 ATC250R incorporated many improvements over the prior 1982 model, mainly with the introduction of Pro-Link suspension, folding foot pegs, a larger fuel tank, slightly longer travel suspension in front and rear, and other improvements.

The 1986 ATC250R was the last model year offered for sale in the United States, after an agreement between manufacturers and the Consumer Product Safety Commission to cease production on all 3-wheeled ATVs. This was the result of thousands of legal battles regarding safety issues and high accident rates.

The 1986 Honda TRX250R Fourtrax was the 4 wheeled brother of the ATC250R, with an engine that was virtually the same (with slightly less horsepower).

Honda also created three other machines of similar size for their HRC race team, but these were not production models. These machines are the ATC125R, ATC200R, ATC300R, ATC350R, ATC400R, ATC480R, and ATC500R. Of these machines, the ATC200R was most popular. Rumour has it that before the cease of production, Honda was building an ATC500R for production.

Engine Specifications[edit]
Engine type - Water-cooled 1985-1986, 2-stroke, single-cylinder
Bore & Stroke - 66 x 72 mm
Displacement - 248 cc for 1981-1984 or 246 cc for 1985 and 1986
Compression ratio - 8.0 to 1

Lubrication - fuel:oil mixture
Air filtration - foam element

Cylinder Bore - 66.020 - 66.040
Piston/cylinder clearance - 0.060 - 0.080
Piston Diameter - 65.94 - 65.96 mm
Pison pin bore - 18.007 - 18.013 mm
Piston pin outer diameter - 17.994 - 18.000 mm
Piston-to-piston pin clearance - .007 - .019 mm
Piston rings per piston compression - 2
Ring end gap - .20 - .40 mm
Ring side clearance - .045 - .075 mm
Connecting rod (sm end inner diameter) - 21.997 - 22.009 mm

The Honda Super Cub, in this modelsheet the C102, is a Honda underbone motorcycle with a four stroke single cylinder engine ranging in displacement from 49 to 109 cc (3.0 to 6.7 cu in). The first Super Cub variation was the C102, launched in April 1960. The C102 had electric start in addition to kick starting, and battery & coil ignition instead of magneto, but was otherwise the same as the C100. The C102 stayed in production for six model years, through 1965, and the C110 Sports Cub through 1966.

The Honda Super Cub is a Honda underbone motorcycle with a four stroke single cylinder engine ranging in displacement from 49 to 109 cc (3.0 to 6.7 cu in).

In continuous manufacture since 1958 with production surpassing 60 million in 2008, and 87 million in 2014, the Super Cub is the most produced motor vehicle* in history.Variants include the C100, C50, C70, C90, C100EX and C70 Passport.

The Super Cub's US advertising campaign, You meet the nicest people on a Honda, had a lasting impact on Honda's image and on American attitudes to motorcycling, and is often used as a marketing case study.

The idea for a new 50-cubic-centimetre (3.1 cu in) motorcycle was conceived in 1956, when Honda Motor's Soichiro Honda and Takeo Fujisawa toured Germany and witnessed the popularity of mopeds and lightweight motorcycles. Soichiro Honda was primarily the engineering and production leader of the company, always with an eye towards winning on the racetrack, while his close partner Fujisawa was the man of finance and business, heading up sales and formulating strategies intended to dominate markets and utterly destroy Honda Motor's competitors. Fujisawa had been thinking about a long term expansion strategy, and unlike other Japanese companies, they did not want to simply boost production to cash in on the recent economic boom in Japan. A small, high performance motorcycle was central to his plans. Upwardly mobile consumers in postwar Europe typically went from a bicycle to a clip on engine, then bought a scooter, then a bubble car, and then a small car and onwards. Fujisawa saw that a motorcycle did not fit in this pattern for the average person, and he saw an opportunity to change that. Soichiro Honda was at the time tired of listening to Fujisawa talk about his new motorcycle idea; Honda came to Europe to win the Isle of Man TT race and wanted to think about little else.

1954 Kreidler K50
Fujisawa and Honda visited Kreidler and Lambretta showrooms, as well as others, researching the kind of motorcycle Fujisawa had in mind. Fujisawa said the designs had "no future" and would not sell well. His concept was a two wheeler for everyman, one that would appeal to both developed and developing countries, urban and rural. The new motorcycle needed to be technologically simple to survive in places without up to date know how and access to advanced tools or reliable spare parts supplies. The common consumer complaints of noise, poor reliability, especially in the electrics, and general difficulty of use would have to be addressed. Because Honda was a large company growing larger, it needed a mass appeal product that could be produced on an enormous scale. The design had to be sorted out before production began, because it would be too costly to fix problems in the vast numbers that were to be manufactured. The scooter type nearly fitted the bill, but was too complex for developing countries to maintain, and the small wheels did poorly on badly maintained or nonexistent roads. Another of Fujusawa's requirements was that it could be ridden with one hand while carrying a tray of soba noodles, saying to Honda, "If you can design a small motorcycle, say 50 cc with a cover to hide the engine and hoses and wires inside, I can sell it. I don't know how many soba noodle shops there are in Japan, but I bet you that every shop will want one for deliveries."

Once interested, Soichiro Honda began developing the Super Cub on his return to Japan. The following year Honda displayed a mockup to Fujisawa that finally matched what he had in mind, Fujisawa declaring the annual sales would be 30,000 per month, half again as many as the entire monthly two-wheeler market in Japan. His goal was to export motorcycles on a scale yet unseen in the economic disorder of postwar Japan, when most companies' halting trade efforts were handled through foreign trading companies. Honda would have to establish its own overseas subsidiary to provide the necessary service and spare parts distribution in a large country like the United States. To this end American Honda Motor Company was founded in 1959. In 1961 a sales network was established in Germany, then in Belgium and the UK in 1962, and then France in 1964.

The Honda Juno had been the first scooter to use polyester resin, or fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP), bodywork, and even though production of the Juno had stopped in 1954 as a result of Honda Motor's financial and labor problems at the time, Fujisawa continued to encourage research in polyester resin casting techniques, and these efforts bore fruit for the Super Cub. The new motorcycle's fairing would be polyethylene, the most widely used plastic, which reduced weight over FRP, but Honda's supplier had never made such a large die cast before, so the die had to be provided by Honda. The Super Cub was the first motorcycle ever to use a plastic fairing. Motorcycling historian Clement Salvadori wrote that the plastic front fender and leg shields were, "perhaps the Cub's greatest contribution; plastic did the job just as well as metal at considerably lower cost." The technology developed in the Isle of Man TT racing program was equally vital to the new lightweight motorcycle, making possible 3.4 kilowatts (4.5 hp) from a 50 cc four-stroke Honda engine, where the first engine the company built a decade earlier, a "fairly exact copy" of the 50 cc two stroke war-surplus Tohatsu engine Honda had been selling as motorized bicycle auxiliary engine, had only a 0.37–0.75 kilowatts (0.5–1 hp) output. Honda's first four stroke, the 1951 E-type, had just a little more power than the Super Cub, 3.7 kilowatts (5 bhp), with nearly triple the displacement, 146 cc (8.9 cu in).

To make the new motorcycle, Honda built a new ¥10 billion factory in Suzuka, Mie to manufacture 30,000, and with two shifts, 50,000, Super Cubs per month. The factory was modeled on the Volkswagen Beetle production line in Wolfsburg, Germany. Until then, Honda's top models had sold only 2,000 to 3,000 per month, and observers thought the cost of the new plant too risky an expenditure. Edward Turner of BSA went to Japan to see the motorcycle industry in September 1960, and said that investments the size of the Suzuka plant were "extremely dangerous" because the US motorcycle market was already saturated. When completed in 1960, the Suzuka Factory was the largest motorcycle factory in the world, and was a model for Honda's mass production facilities of the future. The economies of scale achieved at Suzuka cut 18% from the cost of producing each Super Cub when Suzuka could be run at full capacity, but in the short term Honda faced excess inventory problems when the new factory went into operation before the full sales and distribution network was in place.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honda_Super_Cub

The C110 Sports Cub debuted in October 1960. The C110 was more like a traditional motorcycle that the rider had to straddle, not a step-through. It had a different frame, with the fuel tank in the on top of the frame and in front of the seat, and the frame's steel tube spine ran horizontally from the head tube to the seat. It also had a bit more power, increased from 3.4 to 3.7 kW (4.5 to 5 bhp) @ 9,500 rpm. The C110 stayed in production for six model years until 1966.

The Honda Super Cub is a Honda underbone motorcycle with a four stroke single cylinder engine ranging in displacement from 49 to 109 cc (3.0 to 6.7 cu in).

In continuous manufacture since 1958 with production surpassing 60 million in 2008, and 87 million in 2014, the Super Cub is the most produced motor vehicle* in history.Variants include the C100, C50, C70, C90, C100EX and C70 Passport.

The Super Cub's US advertising campaign, You meet the nicest people on a Honda, had a lasting impact on Honda's image and on American attitudes to motorcycling, and is often used as a marketing case study.

The idea for a new 50-cubic-centimetre (3.1 cu in) motorcycle was conceived in 1956, when Honda Motor's Soichiro Honda and Takeo Fujisawa toured Germany and witnessed the popularity of mopeds and lightweight motorcycles. Soichiro Honda was primarily the engineering and production leader of the company, always with an eye towards winning on the racetrack, while his close partner Fujisawa was the man of finance and business, heading up sales and formulating strategies intended to dominate markets and utterly destroy Honda Motor's competitors. Fujisawa had been thinking about a long term expansion strategy, and unlike other Japanese companies, they did not want to simply boost production to cash in on the recent economic boom in Japan. A small, high performance motorcycle was central to his plans. Upwardly mobile consumers in postwar Europe typically went from a bicycle to a clip on engine, then bought a scooter, then a bubble car, and then a small car and onwards. Fujisawa saw that a motorcycle did not fit in this pattern for the average person, and he saw an opportunity to change that. Soichiro Honda was at the time tired of listening to Fujisawa talk about his new motorcycle idea; Honda came to Europe to win the Isle of Man TT race and wanted to think about little else.

1954 Kreidler K50
Fujisawa and Honda visited Kreidler and Lambretta showrooms, as well as others, researching the kind of motorcycle Fujisawa had in mind. Fujisawa said the designs had "no future" and would not sell well. His concept was a two wheeler for everyman, one that would appeal to both developed and developing countries, urban and rural. The new motorcycle needed to be technologically simple to survive in places without up to date know how and access to advanced tools or reliable spare parts supplies. The common consumer complaints of noise, poor reliability, especially in the electrics, and general difficulty of use would have to be addressed. Because Honda was a large company growing larger, it needed a mass appeal product that could be produced on an enormous scale. The design had to be sorted out before production began, because it would be too costly to fix problems in the vast numbers that were to be manufactured. The scooter type nearly fitted the bill, but was too complex for developing countries to maintain, and the small wheels did poorly on badly maintained or nonexistent roads. Another of Fujusawa's requirements was that it could be ridden with one hand while carrying a tray of soba noodles, saying to Honda, "If you can design a small motorcycle, say 50 cc with a cover to hide the engine and hoses and wires inside, I can sell it. I don't know how many soba noodle shops there are in Japan, but I bet you that every shop will want one for deliveries."

Once interested, Soichiro Honda began developing the Super Cub on his return to Japan. The following year Honda displayed a mockup to Fujisawa that finally matched what he had in mind, Fujisawa declaring the annual sales would be 30,000 per month, half again as many as the entire monthly two-wheeler market in Japan. His goal was to export motorcycles on a scale yet unseen in the economic disorder of postwar Japan, when most companies' halting trade efforts were handled through foreign trading companies. Honda would have to establish its own overseas subsidiary to provide the necessary service and spare parts distribution in a large country like the United States. To this end American Honda Motor Company was founded in 1959. In 1961 a sales network was established in Germany, then in Belgium and the UK in 1962, and then France in 1964.

The Honda Juno had been the first scooter to use polyester resin, or fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP), bodywork, and even though production of the Juno had stopped in 1954 as a result of Honda Motor's financial and labor problems at the time, Fujisawa continued to encourage research in polyester resin casting techniques, and these efforts bore fruit for the Super Cub. The new motorcycle's fairing would be polyethylene, the most widely used plastic, which reduced weight over FRP, but Honda's supplier had never made such a large die cast before, so the die had to be provided by Honda. The Super Cub was the first motorcycle ever to use a plastic fairing. Motorcycling historian Clement Salvadori wrote that the plastic front fender and leg shields were, "perhaps the Cub's greatest contribution; plastic did the job just as well as metal at considerably lower cost." The technology developed in the Isle of Man TT racing program was equally vital to the new lightweight motorcycle, making possible 3.4 kilowatts (4.5 hp) from a 50 cc four-stroke Honda engine, where the first engine the company built a decade earlier, a "fairly exact copy" of the 50 cc two stroke war-surplus Tohatsu engine Honda had been selling as motorized bicycle auxiliary engine, had only a 0.37–0.75 kilowatts (0.5–1 hp) output. Honda's first four stroke, the 1951 E-type, had just a little more power than the Super Cub, 3.7 kilowatts (5 bhp), with nearly triple the displacement, 146 cc (8.9 cu in).

To make the new motorcycle, Honda built a new ¥10 billion factory in Suzuka, Mie to manufacture 30,000, and with two shifts, 50,000, Super Cubs per month. The factory was modeled on the Volkswagen Beetle production line in Wolfsburg, Germany. Until then, Honda's top models had sold only 2,000 to 3,000 per month, and observers thought the cost of the new plant too risky an expenditure. Edward Turner of BSA went to Japan to see the motorcycle industry in September 1960, and said that investments the size of the Suzuka plant were "extremely dangerous" because the US motorcycle market was already saturated. When completed in 1960, the Suzuka Factory was the largest motorcycle factory in the world, and was a model for Honda's mass production facilities of the future. The economies of scale achieved at Suzuka cut 18% from the cost of producing each Super Cub when Suzuka could be run at full capacity, but in the short term Honda faced excess inventory problems when the new factory went into operation before the full sales and distribution network was in place.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honda_Super_Cub

The Honda Super Cub is a Honda underbone motorcycle with a four stroke single cylinder engine ranging in displacement from 49 to 109 cc (3.0 to 6.7 cu in).

In continuous manufacture since 1958 with production surpassing 60 million in 2008, and 87 million in 2014, the Super Cub is the most produced motor vehicle* in history.Variants include the C100, C50, C70, C90, C100EX and C70 Passport.

The Super Cub's US advertising campaign, You meet the nicest people on a Honda, had a lasting impact on Honda's image and on American attitudes to motorcycling, and is often used as a marketing case study.

The idea for a new 50-cubic-centimetre (3.1 cu in) motorcycle was conceived in 1956, when Honda Motor's Soichiro Honda and Takeo Fujisawa toured Germany and witnessed the popularity of mopeds and lightweight motorcycles. Soichiro Honda was primarily the engineering and production leader of the company, always with an eye towards winning on the racetrack, while his close partner Fujisawa was the man of finance and business, heading up sales and formulating strategies intended to dominate markets and utterly destroy Honda Motor's competitors. Fujisawa had been thinking about a long term expansion strategy, and unlike other Japanese companies, they did not want to simply boost production to cash in on the recent economic boom in Japan. A small, high performance motorcycle was central to his plans. Upwardly mobile consumers in postwar Europe typically went from a bicycle to a clip on engine, then bought a scooter, then a bubble car, and then a small car and onwards. Fujisawa saw that a motorcycle did not fit in this pattern for the average person, and he saw an opportunity to change that. Soichiro Honda was at the time tired of listening to Fujisawa talk about his new motorcycle idea; Honda came to Europe to win the Isle of Man TT race and wanted to think about little else.

1954 Kreidler K50
Fujisawa and Honda visited Kreidler and Lambretta showrooms, as well as others, researching the kind of motorcycle Fujisawa had in mind. Fujisawa said the designs had "no future" and would not sell well. His concept was a two wheeler for everyman, one that would appeal to both developed and developing countries, urban and rural. The new motorcycle needed to be technologically simple to survive in places without up to date know how and access to advanced tools or reliable spare parts supplies. The common consumer complaints of noise, poor reliability, especially in the electrics, and general difficulty of use would have to be addressed. Because Honda was a large company growing larger, it needed a mass appeal product that could be produced on an enormous scale. The design had to be sorted out before production began, because it would be too costly to fix problems in the vast numbers that were to be manufactured. The scooter type nearly fitted the bill, but was too complex for developing countries to maintain, and the small wheels did poorly on badly maintained or nonexistent roads. Another of Fujusawa's requirements was that it could be ridden with one hand while carrying a tray of soba noodles, saying to Honda, "If you can design a small motorcycle, say 50 cc with a cover to hide the engine and hoses and wires inside, I can sell it. I don't know how many soba noodle shops there are in Japan, but I bet you that every shop will want one for deliveries."

Once interested, Soichiro Honda began developing the Super Cub on his return to Japan. The following year Honda displayed a mockup to Fujisawa that finally matched what he had in mind, Fujisawa declaring the annual sales would be 30,000 per month, half again as many as the entire monthly two-wheeler market in Japan. His goal was to export motorcycles on a scale yet unseen in the economic disorder of postwar Japan, when most companies' halting trade efforts were handled through foreign trading companies. Honda would have to establish its own overseas subsidiary to provide the necessary service and spare parts distribution in a large country like the United States. To this end American Honda Motor Company was founded in 1959. In 1961 a sales network was established in Germany, then in Belgium and the UK in 1962, and then France in 1964.

The Honda Juno had been the first scooter to use polyester resin, or fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP), bodywork, and even though production of the Juno had stopped in 1954 as a result of Honda Motor's financial and labor problems at the time, Fujisawa continued to encourage research in polyester resin casting techniques, and these efforts bore fruit for the Super Cub. The new motorcycle's fairing would be polyethylene, the most widely used plastic, which reduced weight over FRP, but Honda's supplier had never made such a large die cast before, so the die had to be provided by Honda. The Super Cub was the first motorcycle ever to use a plastic fairing. Motorcycling historian Clement Salvadori wrote that the plastic front fender and leg shields were, "perhaps the Cub's greatest contribution; plastic did the job just as well as metal at considerably lower cost." The technology developed in the Isle of Man TT racing program was equally vital to the new lightweight motorcycle, making possible 3.4 kilowatts (4.5 hp) from a 50 cc four-stroke Honda engine, where the first engine the company built a decade earlier, a "fairly exact copy" of the 50 cc two stroke war-surplus Tohatsu engine Honda had been selling as motorized bicycle auxiliary engine, had only a 0.37–0.75 kilowatts (0.5–1 hp) output. Honda's first four stroke, the 1951 E-type, had just a little more power than the Super Cub, 3.7 kilowatts (5 bhp), with nearly triple the displacement, 146 cc (8.9 cu in).

To make the new motorcycle, Honda built a new ¥10 billion factory in Suzuka, Mie to manufacture 30,000, and with two shifts, 50,000, Super Cubs per month. The factory was modeled on the Volkswagen Beetle production line in Wolfsburg, Germany. Until then, Honda's top models had sold only 2,000 to 3,000 per month, and observers thought the cost of the new plant too risky an expenditure. Edward Turner of BSA went to Japan to see the motorcycle industry in September 1960, and said that investments the size of the Suzuka plant were "extremely dangerous" because the US motorcycle market was already saturated. When completed in 1960, the Suzuka Factory was the largest motorcycle factory in the world, and was a model for Honda's mass production facilities of the future. The economies of scale achieved at Suzuka cut 18% from the cost of producing each Super Cub when Suzuka could be run at full capacity, but in the short term Honda faced excess inventory problems when the new factory went into operation before the full sales and distribution network was in place.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honda_Super_Cub

The Honda CB125 was a 122 cc (7.4 cu in) motorcycle made by Honda from 1971-1975 (1973-1985 in the US). It had an overhead camshaft (OHC) engine with a 9500 rpm redline. The "S" model was produced from 1971 to 1975 and was replaced in 1976 by the "J" model (the US bikes retained the S designation). The newer model sported a two piece head, 124 cc (7.6 cu in) displacement, and a larger carburetor.

Major changes
Aside from different color schemes and minor lettering differences, these are some of the major design changes:

1973 - First year the bike was released in the US as CB125S0.
1974 - Front drum brake changed to disk, tachometer was added.
1976 - Engine displacement increased from 122 to 124 cc (7.4 to 7.6 cu in), tachometer was eliminated.
1979 - Front disk brake was changed back to drum.
1980 - Point ignition was changed to capacitive discharge.
1983 - The bike was not produced this year.
1984 - The electrical system was changed from 6 to 12 volts.
1985 - The last year the bike was released in the US, headlight shape was changed from round to rectangular.

Honda CB125E
The Honda CB125E is a 125cc four-stroke commuter motorcycle, manufactured by the Honda Motor Company. It has electric start and a 5 speed gearbox. The engine produces approximately 10 hp (7 kW; 10 PS). The bike is equipped with front disc and rear drum brakes. Electrics are 12 volt with capacitor discharge electronic ignition and the machine is electric start only.

Top speed with a single rider is approximately 100 km/h (62 mph). Although good for city commuting, the bike lacks power and speed to keep up with free-way speeds in Australia.

It went on sale in Australia in 2012 and became one of the most reasonably priced road bikes.

The Honda CB200 and CL200 Scrambler are standard and dual-sport motorcycles made from 1973 to 1979. The CB200 replaced the CB175 model and has very similar specifications. The CL200 shares many parts with the CB200 but has an upswept exhaust system to avoid off road hazards.

The CB200 has a chain driven single overhead camshaft parallel twin engine with dual carburetors and five speed gearbox. It had both an electric and kick starter. A distinguishing feature is the rubber trim down the middle of the fuel tank. Depending on where in the world the bike was sold it is known as a CB200A/CB200B or CB200K/CB200T. All CB200s had a rear drum brake. Early models (CB200A - 73 and 74) had a drum front brake, later models (CB200B - 75 and 79) had a cable operated front disc brake.

CL200 Scrambler

1974 Honda CL200
The CL200 Scrambler was a dual-sport made only in 1974, with a 198 cc (12.1 cu in) four-stroke OHC parallel twin cylinder engine mated to a 5 speed transmission. It was similar to the CB200 except the exhaust system of the Scrambler was mounted above the gearbox with both pipes on the left side of the bike, whereas on the CB200 it was mounted under the transmission gearbox on both sides of the bike. The CL exhaust pipe and heat shield were chrome.

The 1974 CL200 marked the end of the evolution of the smaller Honda twin scramblers that began with the CL160 in 1965. In 1968, the CL175 was introduced and ran a full production line until 1973. As many other motorcycles were ever increasing in size, the 1974 CL200 was introduced and marked the end of the line as it was not continued into a second year.

Honda CB400F

This article is about the CB400F sold between 1975-78. For the CB400F sold between 1989-90, see Honda CB-1.

The Honda CB400F is a motorcycle produced by Honda from 1975 to 1977. It first appeared at the 1974 Cologne motorcycle show, Intermot, and was dropped from the Honda range in 1978. It had an air-cooled, transverse mounted 408 cc (24.9 cu in) inline four cylinder engine with two valves per cylinder operated by a single chain driven over head camshaft. Fuelling was provided by four 20 mm Keihin carburettors. The CB400F is commonly known as the Honda 400 Four.

Background

After introducing the four-cylinder CB750 motorcycle in 1969, Honda followed with a string of smaller capacity four cylinder models; the CB500 Four in 1971 and the CB350 Four in 1972. The CB350F was available for two years until Honda announced the CB400F model.

For the most part, the CB400F was simply an upgraded version of the 350 model from the previous year. At the time Honda's R&D department had devoted much of its resources towards automobile models such as the Civic. This meant that motorbike development was limited to mechanical changes. In order to develop the CB350F into the CB400F, Honda increased the bore and modified the cylinder head to raise the compression ratio. In a first for Honda, a sixth ratio was fitted to the gearbox. Instead of aping the styling of the bigger Universal Japanese Motorcycle (UJM) style CB750, like the 350F had, the CB400F had a more café racer look with lower handle bars, rear set footpegs and more svelte styling. It also gained one its most recognisable attributes, a swooping four-into-one exhaust system.

Although aimed at the sporting segment of the market, the four-stroke CB400F did not have the acceleration of the competition's two-strokes, particularly the triples from Kawasaki. But what the CB400F engine lacked in power it made up for in refinement, the small-displacement four-stroke being smoother, quieter and much more economical than the two-strokes.

Reception

The CB400F was widely well received by the motoring press and reviewers. They praised its renewed focus over the previous 350F model, preferring its clean lines and sporty café racer looks. In America however the CB400F was not the sales success Honda had anticipated. Honda revised the model in the US in an attempt to recapture lost sales by fitting higher bars and footpegs set further forward, but the CB400F struggled against the dominant Kawasaki twin cylinder model. It was also 15% to 20% more expensive than its competition.

Variants

The CB400F was produced in three variants during its production cycle; the F, F1 and F2.

1975: Launch model had swingarm-mounted passenger footpegs and was available in Light Ruby Red or Varnish Blue.
1976: Passenger footpegs were moved to a loop off of the rear subframe. It also gained a lock for the fuel filler cap.
1977: F1 model released as an US and Canadian only model with few bikes coming over to the United Kingdom. It had higher bars and footrests repositioned further forward to cater to consumer demand.
1978: F2 model was virtually the same as the earlier F model except for a minor restyled fuel tank and decal changes. This variant was available in Candy Antares Red and Parakeet Yellow. American F2 bikes had black side covers. Longer cylinder head studs were fitted after engine number 1084315 to try to remedy the problem oil weeping from the head gasket.
To comply with licence restrictions in France and Japan Honda also produced a 398 cc (24.3 cu in) version by fitting a shorter 48.8 mm (1.92 in) stroke crankshaft.

Performance

The CB400F produced a claimed 37 bhp (28 kW) at 8,500 rpm and 24 lb·ft (33 N·m) at 7,500 rpm. Bike magazine reported a 0 to 1⁄4 mile (0 to 400 m) time of 14.68 seconds. During the same road test they recorded a top speed of 103.80 mph (167.05 km/h) prone and 93.5 mph (150.5 km/h) sitting up.

Racing

The CB400F was a very successful motorcycle in club or privateer racing. Kaz Yoshima, a former employee at Honda's R&D department in Japan, built 492 cc (30.0 cu in) race versions capable of 13,500 rpm and producing an estimated 60 bhp (45 kW). Ron Haslam won the 1980 Formula 3 title on a CB400F prepared by Honda dealer Nettleton Motorcycles. He also came third in the F3 class at the Isle of Man TT on the same machine. Racing versions of the CB400F were also raced successfully in the Formula 2 under 500 cc four stroke/350 two-stroke class.

Legacy

Around 105,000 CB400F units were sold. The CB400F was succeeded by the lighter and more powerful twin cylinder Honda CB400T. It wasn't until 1989 that Honda introduced another 400 cc inline-four, the all new Honda CB-1. The 2006 PlayStation 2 title Tourist Trophy featured a CB400 Four as a prize for getting a gold 'Junior License'. In late 2011 a UK based company, David Silver Spares, announced they would be acquiring used CB400F's to restore and resell to the public. The aim was to use economies of scale to restore 49 CB400F bikes in batches. The project was featured by Classic Bike magazine in April 2012 and showcased the bike owned by Top Gear presenter James May.

The Honda CB50 is a 50 cc (3.1 cu in), single-cylinder, four-stroke, SOHC street motorcycle manufactured by the Honda Motor Company, from 1971.

The Honda CL70 Scrambler was a small motorcycle with a 72 cc (4.4 cu in) four-stroke engine, a pressed steel frame and a four-speed manual gearbox. It was built by Honda between 1969 and 1973. It essentially replaced the Honda CL90. It was very similar to a CL50 with a larger engine. As a scrambler, it had a high-mount exhaust and a high rear fender. This allowed the look, though not really the capability, of extended off-road capability, before real dual-sport motorcycles were available.

The Honda Super Cub is a Honda underbone motorcycle with a four stroke single cylinder engine ranging in displacement from 49 to 109 cc (3.0 to 6.7 cu in).

In continuous manufacture since 1958 with production surpassing 60 million in 2008, and 87 million in 2014, the Super Cub is the most produced motor vehicle* in history.Variants include the C100, C50, C70, C90, C100EX and C70 Passport.

The Super Cub's US advertising campaign, You meet the nicest people on a Honda, had a lasting impact on Honda's image and on American attitudes to motorcycling, and is often used as a marketing case study.

The idea for a new 50-cubic-centimetre (3.1 cu in) motorcycle was conceived in 1956, when Honda Motor's Soichiro Honda and Takeo Fujisawa toured Germany and witnessed the popularity of mopeds and lightweight motorcycles. Soichiro Honda was primarily the engineering and production leader of the company, always with an eye towards winning on the racetrack, while his close partner Fujisawa was the man of finance and business, heading up sales and formulating strategies intended to dominate markets and utterly destroy Honda Motor's competitors. Fujisawa had been thinking about a long term expansion strategy, and unlike other Japanese companies, they did not want to simply boost production to cash in on the recent economic boom in Japan. A small, high performance motorcycle was central to his plans. Upwardly mobile consumers in postwar Europe typically went from a bicycle to a clip on engine, then bought a scooter, then a bubble car, and then a small car and onwards. Fujisawa saw that a motorcycle did not fit in this pattern for the average person, and he saw an opportunity to change that. Soichiro Honda was at the time tired of listening to Fujisawa talk about his new motorcycle idea; Honda came to Europe to win the Isle of Man TT race and wanted to think about little else.

1954 Kreidler K50
Fujisawa and Honda visited Kreidler and Lambretta showrooms, as well as others, researching the kind of motorcycle Fujisawa had in mind. Fujisawa said the designs had "no future" and would not sell well. His concept was a two wheeler for everyman, one that would appeal to both developed and developing countries, urban and rural. The new motorcycle needed to be technologically simple to survive in places without up to date know how and access to advanced tools or reliable spare parts supplies. The common consumer complaints of noise, poor reliability, especially in the electrics, and general difficulty of use would have to be addressed. Because Honda was a large company growing larger, it needed a mass appeal product that could be produced on an enormous scale. The design had to be sorted out before production began, because it would be too costly to fix problems in the vast numbers that were to be manufactured. The scooter type nearly fitted the bill, but was too complex for developing countries to maintain, and the small wheels did poorly on badly maintained or nonexistent roads. Another of Fujusawa's requirements was that it could be ridden with one hand while carrying a tray of soba noodles, saying to Honda, "If you can design a small motorcycle, say 50 cc with a cover to hide the engine and hoses and wires inside, I can sell it. I don't know how many soba noodle shops there are in Japan, but I bet you that every shop will want one for deliveries."

Once interested, Soichiro Honda began developing the Super Cub on his return to Japan. The following year Honda displayed a mockup to Fujisawa that finally matched what he had in mind, Fujisawa declaring the annual sales would be 30,000 per month, half again as many as the entire monthly two-wheeler market in Japan. His goal was to export motorcycles on a scale yet unseen in the economic disorder of postwar Japan, when most companies' halting trade efforts were handled through foreign trading companies. Honda would have to establish its own overseas subsidiary to provide the necessary service and spare parts distribution in a large country like the United States. To this end American Honda Motor Company was founded in 1959. In 1961 a sales network was established in Germany, then in Belgium and the UK in 1962, and then France in 1964.

The Honda Juno had been the first scooter to use polyester resin, or fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP), bodywork, and even though production of the Juno had stopped in 1954 as a result of Honda Motor's financial and labor problems at the time, Fujisawa continued to encourage research in polyester resin casting techniques, and these efforts bore fruit for the Super Cub. The new motorcycle's fairing would be polyethylene, the most widely used plastic, which reduced weight over FRP, but Honda's supplier had never made such a large die cast before, so the die had to be provided by Honda. The Super Cub was the first motorcycle ever to use a plastic fairing. Motorcycling historian Clement Salvadori wrote that the plastic front fender and leg shields were, "perhaps the Cub's greatest contribution; plastic did the job just as well as metal at considerably lower cost." The technology developed in the Isle of Man TT racing program was equally vital to the new lightweight motorcycle, making possible 3.4 kilowatts (4.5 hp) from a 50 cc four-stroke Honda engine, where the first engine the company built a decade earlier, a "fairly exact copy" of the 50 cc two stroke war-surplus Tohatsu engine Honda had been selling as motorized bicycle auxiliary engine, had only a 0.37–0.75 kilowatts (0.5–1 hp) output. Honda's first four stroke, the 1951 E-type, had just a little more power than the Super Cub, 3.7 kilowatts (5 bhp), with nearly triple the displacement, 146 cc (8.9 cu in).

To make the new motorcycle, Honda built a new ¥10 billion factory in Suzuka, Mie to manufacture 30,000, and with two shifts, 50,000, Super Cubs per month. The factory was modeled on the Volkswagen Beetle production line in Wolfsburg, Germany. Until then, Honda's top models had sold only 2,000 to 3,000 per month, and observers thought the cost of the new plant too risky an expenditure. Edward Turner of BSA went to Japan to see the motorcycle industry in September 1960, and said that investments the size of the Suzuka plant were "extremely dangerous" because the US motorcycle market was already saturated. When completed in 1960, the Suzuka Factory was the largest motorcycle factory in the world, and was a model for Honda's mass production facilities of the future. The economies of scale achieved at Suzuka cut 18% from the cost of producing each Super Cub when Suzuka could be run at full capacity, but in the short term Honda faced excess inventory problems when the new factory went into operation before the full sales and distribution network was in place.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honda_Super_Cub

 

The Honda Motra is a minibike produced in 1982-1983 for the Japanese domestic market.

Honda marketed the vehicle as a heavy-duty recreation bike with a large load capacity.

The Motra has a distinctively rugged appearance, with angular steel tube and panel framework supporting large racks fore and aft. The utility/military style is emphasized by a lack of decorative chrome, and a solid yellow or green paint scheme for all bodywork and wheels.

The Motra's 3-speed gearbox is coupled with a second stage to provide the same 3-speeds with a lower final ratio for low-speed off-road travel in steep terrain.

The Motra's CT50 designation is a slight exception in Honda nomenclature in that 'CT' does not indicate a mechanical family of bikes. It is distinct from the CT70, which is an ST-series bike for the US and Canadian market, and from the CT50/CT90/CT110 Trail Cubs, which are an offshoot of the Super Cub bikes. The Motra's CT50 designation is a re-use of the Trail Cub CT50 designation from 1968.

In 2004 Honda resurrected the Motra's style, but not off-road utility, with the PS250 Big Ruckus scooter.

The Honda CT90 was a small step-through motorcycle manufactured by Honda from 1966 to 1979. It was offered in two models: Trail or X with the main variations being gear ratios and tyre style.

Predecessors
The CT90 Trail 90 was preceded by the CT200 Trail 90, which had a dual-sprocket in the rear, with which to shift to the low range the operator clipped an extra length of chain into the drive and ran it over a double-size rear sprocket.

The CT200 had an 87 cc iron-head pushrod OHV engine, instead of the CT90's 89 cc alloy head OHC. There were also earlier trail models of smaller displacement, including the C105T Trail 55.

Early overhead cam CT90 models also featured the dual sprocket setup rather than the sub-transmission of all later models.

Market
Honda targeted hunters, fishermen, commuters, and outdoorsmen with the Trail 90. Early ads often had these bikes in wilderness settings. They were well suited to narrow trails, being small and lightweight (around 188 pounds) and with a forgiving suspension. The bike was ideal for climbing and carrying packs. The four-stroke engine was quiet and almost all models were equipped with spark-arrestor exhausts.

While targeted at off-road users, this was not a dirt bike in the conventional sense. It could be registered for road use, and it had a top speed in high-ratio road gear of around 55 mph (89 km/h).[citation needed] Fuel economy was excellent, often around and above 100mpg.[citation needed] In local commuter traffic, it was extremely maneuverable, though it was poorly suited for highway travel due to limited power, off-road-biased tyres, and top speed.

Trail 90s were also modified, by aftermarket vendor Suitcase Cycle, for quick breakdown and compact transport via general aviation aircraft.

Design
The CT90 in its classic form was an 89 cc 4-stroke air-cooled single with a four-speed transmission and a semi-automatic clutch, coupled with a 1.867:1 ratio reduction box that was manually switched into operation using a small lever under the transmission case. The cylinder was nearly horizontal in the step-through tube/stamping frame. The fork was originally a leading link suspension, replaced in 1969 with conventional telescoping-tube suspension.

Successor
The CT90 ended production in 1979, replaced the following year by the CT110, which was essentially the same machine bored out to 105 cc and weighing slightly more. The 1980 CT110 lacked the reduction box; however, it returned in following years.

The Honda P50 (known as the P25 in some markets) was introduced in June 1966. It earns a place in history as being the last motor-wheel moped design by Honda (and probably by any other large manufacturer).

It features a step-through frame made from steel pressings, leading-link front suspension, plastic fenders and chainguard. The fuel tank is located above the rear fender, and the key distinguishing feature of the design is the 49 cc (3.0 cu in) engine being located at the extreme lower left rear of the frame, with all of the driveline components housed within the large hub of the rear wheel.

The engine is also 4-stroke - unusual when almost all pedal-equipped mopeds used simpler 2-strokes. Soichiro Honda disliked the sharp noise of 2-strokes, and the 4-stroke does not require oil to be mixed with the gasoline at every fill-up.

The Honda PC50 is a moped produced by the Honda Motor Company in Japan from May 1969 until February 1977. The PC50, though much smaller and lighter, had some similar features to Honda's popular C50 /70 /90 Super Cub line, with a step-through pressed-steel frame, a fuel tank under the saddle, a chain cover, and optionally equipped with leg shields,

Engine
A distinctive feature of the PC50 is the use of a four-stroke engine, at a time almost all pedal-equipped mopeds used two-stroke engines. Honda's early development of 50 cc four-stroke engines was a result of Soichiro Honda's dislike of the sharp noise of two-stroke engines.

The PC50 used two different engines during its production. The first models featured an overhead camshaft (OHC) engine derived from the Honda P50 moped which used an engine in wheel arrangement. The OHC engine was used from start of PC50 production until April 1970 when the OHC engine gave way to the OHV (pushrod) engine in the same cycle frame. The new model was re-designated PC50K1.

Simplicity is an important feature of the PC50 with an automatic clutch driving a fixed ratio, splash lubrication to the engine parts except for the use of a small pump to the parallel valves. The sump has an oil capacity of 0.8 - 0.9 litre for the OHC model and 0.75 litre for the OHV. The engine has an 8.5:1 compression ratio, coil ignition with no advance-retard mechanism, and fixed timing position. The engine output is rated as 1.8 bhp @ 5,700rpm, and carburetion served by a 14mm Keihin with a direct shutter choke operated on a simple side lever. The early OHC models had a generator which developed a total 6V x 15W output, which was uprated to 23W with the introduction of the OHV engine in 1970.

Moped drive
The Honda PC50 has no footrests or kick-start, it is a proper moped with a fully effective cycling capability engaged by the operation of a lever on the right hand crankcase. When the lever is engaged in drive ‘on’ mode, the drive is taken through a simple single gear and automatic clutch.

Chassis
The moped chassis is constructed from two pressed-steel halves welded together down the centre-line, with pressed steel leading link fork front, and swingarm rear suspension with telescopic dampers. The under seat 3 litre petrol tank is single sided on the left of the machine. A plastic toolbox takes the position of a dummy fuel tank on the right hand side. Behind the single seat is a useful pressed steel carrier rack.

Variants
There were variants of the PC50 which were not available to the UK market including a standard model with telescopic front forks and the sports-like PS50. This was introduced as a sports variant of the OHC machine. The PS50 had 3-speed gearbox with handlebar twist-grip selection, a manual clutch, a motor cycle style petrol tank, a dual seat and telescopic forks. Overhead valve (OHV) versions were also listed for the PS50.

The Honda Sport 90, Super 90, or S90, was a 90 cc Honda motorcycle based on the Honda Super Cub, made from 1964 to 1969.

The single cylinder OHC air-cooled engine linked to a four speed transmission. It had a hand clutch, and shifting was "1 down, 3 up," with neutral in between 1st and 2nd. There was no tachometer but the speedometer indicated speed ranges for each gear. The top speed was claimed to be 64 mph, and the engine was rated at 8 horsepower.

The engine held a quart of oil and had an internal centrifugal oil filter, and the exhaust had a removable baffle. A metal cylinder behind the carburetor held the air filter. Tools went under the seat in their own compartment.

The frame was pressed steel rather than tubular steel to minimize weight and the bike was fitted with telescopic front forks for improved road holding. The motorcycle was not intended for off road use, as evidenced by the narrow handle bars and street tires; it included no accessories for such travel. 90 miles per US gallon (38 km/l) was not hard to attain, even with spirited riding.

There are a variety of models including the Honda S90, CS90, and the Benly 90. The date of manufacturing can be determined by removing the fuel tank and examining the tag surrounding the wiring harness.

The Honda SS50 is a 50 cc (3.1 cu in) moped manufactured by the Honda Motor Company.

Predecessors were the OHV C110/C11/C114 and OHC S50. Produced from 1961 onwards, the Honda 50 Sport (type C110 and C111) variant of the Super Cub, laid out the basics of all future models: It had a pressed steel frame, hydraulic front/rear forks, a 49 cc OHV four-stroke engine. The cylinder was laid horizontally to optimise cooling. The final drive was chain running in an enclosed chain case. The S50 featured an all-new OHC alloy head engine.

The SS50 replaced these in the late 1960s, using a new T-shaped frame with separate rear mudguard, and telescopic front forks to replace the leading links.

The SS50 replaced the OHV C110 and derivatives, with the SS standing for "Super Sports". Basically with the same form as the S50, it had a few upgrades:

The first SS50s in the late 1960s were delivered with chrome panelled tank, and frame painted in the same colour as the tank's paintwork. Later on they got a longer, thinner 7 l (1.5 imp gal; 1.8 US gal) petrol tank in red, blue or yellow and a rat grey frame, and chromed mudguards. Introduced with a four-speed gearbox, the handlebar controls and switches corresponded to the high level of other Honda motorcycle models, made from cast aluminum, and a standard rear-view mirror. All three of these bikes came complete with a chromed high level exhaust and heat shield.

The later five speed SS50 had an extra gear and the engine was also tuned up making it faster and more competitive in the UK market. The frames of the later five-speed models were black differing to the rat grey of the four-speed. The last five-speed versions had a front disc brake instead of the twin drums used earlier.

As a moped, to comply with the legal requirements in the United Kingdom and some other European countries, the SS50 was available with a pair of bicycle-like pedals. The special pedal cranks allowed both pedals to be rotated forward, so that the pedals would form motorcycle-style footrests in normal operation.

All Mopeds registered in the UK after 1 September 1977 were restricted to a maximum of 31 miles per hour (50 km/h), but did not legally need bicycle pedals.

Competition
The S50 and SS50 varied greatly from their competitors in using a four-stroke engine, with global competitors the Suzuki A50 and A50P (often incorrectly called AP50) and the Yamaha FS1E using two-stroke. This often made the SS50 slower, but more reliable and economical.

Related models
The SS50 49 cc engine was also used in numerous related models including the ST series (minibike) and the Z series "monkey".

In Vietnam
The Honda SS50 is commonly known as a Honda 67 in Vietnam, particularly in the south.

The Honda ST-series minibikes are known as the Dax in Japan and Europe, and the Trail 70 in Canada and the USA.

The ST70 was exported to Canada and the USA as the CT70. This is an exception to Honda's usual practice of prefix letters indicating the bike family, followed by engine size. The CT70 is mechanically unrelated to other CT-series bikes such as the CT50 Motra, and the CT50, CT90 & CT110 Trail Cubs. The ST90 was sold in the USA as the Trailsport, and was not given a CT designation.

The ST50, ST70, and CT70 were introduced in August 1969 and produced through 1981. The larger ST90 was produced from 1973 through 1975. The ST50 was reissued in 1995, and produced through 2000.

The CT70 was also sold in the USA from 1981 through 1994 with a new serial number format: JH2Dxxxxxxxxxxxxx, rather than the CT70-xxxxxxx format used since 1969. These 'JH2D' bikes are not listed in Honda Japan's production figures above, and are perhaps licensed production.

A key feature of the ST-series is the pressed-steel "T-bone" frame that distinguishes it from Honda's other minibikes: the Z50 Monkey & Gorilla, the Ape, the CF50 & CF70, and the CY50 & CY80 Nautydax.

As a general description, the ST-series bikes have a bench-style saddle, small fat tires, and folding handle bars. They have an air-cooled 4-stroke engine with either a semi-automatic 3-speed transmission or a 4-speed manual gearbox. The ST90 uses larger 3.00-14 tires, compared to the 3.50-10 and 4.00-10 of the smaller bikes.

Due to the diminutive wheel-size and limited speed, the ST-series bikes do not always qualify as road-legal vehicles, and were sold in some markets for off-road recreation only. Their licensing status varies with locale and time period during their nearly 40 years of existence.

Jincheng JC50Q
Honda's patents for the original ST-series expired in 1998, and replica bikes have become a popular export product for many Chinese manufacturers such as Jincheng, Lifan, Panda, and Redcat.

The Dax name resurfaced at the 2001 Tokyo Motor Show with the e-DAX concept vehicle, a 25 kg folding electric wheel motor scooter meant to accompany the Bulldog concept car as a trunk bike. This car-scooter combination was previously introduced by Honda in 1981 with the City car and Motocompo folding scooter.

The Honda ST-series minibikes are known as the Dax in Japan and Europe, and the Trail 70 in Canada and the USA.

The ST70 was exported to Canada and the USA as the CT70. This is an exception to Honda's usual practice of prefix letters indicating the bike family, followed by engine size. The CT70 is mechanically unrelated to other CT-series bikes such as the CT50 Motra, and the CT50, CT90 & CT110 Trail Cubs. The ST90 was sold in the USA as the Trailsport, and was not given a CT designation.

The ST50, ST70, and CT70 were introduced in August 1969 and produced through 1981. The larger ST90 was produced from 1973 through 1975. The ST50 was reissued in 1995, and produced through 2000.

The CT70 was also sold in the USA from 1981 through 1994 with a new serial number format: JH2Dxxxxxxxxxxxxx, rather than the CT70-xxxxxxx format used since 1969. These 'JH2D' bikes are not listed in Honda Japan's production figures above, and are perhaps licensed production.

A key feature of the ST-series is the pressed-steel "T-bone" frame that distinguishes it from Honda's other minibikes: the Z50 Monkey & Gorilla, the Ape, the CF50 & CF70, and the CY50 & CY80 Nautydax.

As a general description, the ST-series bikes have a bench-style saddle, small fat tires, and folding handle bars. They have an air-cooled 4-stroke engine with either a semi-automatic 3-speed transmission or a 4-speed manual gearbox. The ST90 uses larger 3.00-14 tires, compared to the 3.50-10 and 4.00-10 of the smaller bikes.

Due to the diminutive wheel-size and limited speed, the ST-series bikes do not always qualify as road-legal vehicles, and were sold in some markets for off-road recreation only. Their licensing status varies with locale and time period during their nearly 40 years of existence.

Jincheng JC50Q
Honda's patents for the original ST-series expired in 1998, and replica bikes have become a popular export product for many Chinese manufacturers such as Jincheng, Lifan, Panda, and Redcat.

The Dax name resurfaced at the 2001 Tokyo Motor Show with the e-DAX concept vehicle, a 25 kg folding electric wheel motor scooter meant to accompany the Bulldog concept car as a trunk bike. This car-scooter combination was previously introduced by Honda in 1981 with the City car and Motocompo folding scooter.

The Honda Z50A was the second generation of Honda's Z50 Series of mini bikes. Though its predecessor, the Z50M, was available in Europe and Japan a few years previous, in 1968 the Z50A-KO "Hard Tail", sometimes referred to as the "High Bar" or the "Slantguard", was the first of the Z50 series to be released to the American market. Upon its release this bike was considered to be a significant leap in technology in comparison to other mini bikes on the market at the time. This was partly because of its efficient 49 cc four-stroke over head cam engine with semi-automatic transmission. Street legal lighting and lowered bars were added on the 1969/70 K1 "Short Tail", the 1970/71 K2 "Long Tail", and in 1972, after frame cracking became a growing issue, Honda incorporated rear suspension on the bike. The Z50A "Soft Tail" remained on the American market until 1978, when it was replaced by the Z50R. In Europe and Japan, the Z50A was renamed the Z50J in 1973, and remained on the market until 1999. The Z50JP is still available in Japan and through exporters in the United Kingdom.

The Honda Z50M was the first Z50 Series of mini bikes produced by Honda. It was first made in late 1966 and released for sale in 1967 to the European, Australian and Canadian markets The first thousand or so were all exported and then they were made available to the Japanese Market, becoming one of Honda's first practical mini bikes. The Z50M was fully equipped with headlight taillight rear brake light and horn and mirror and was able to be registered for road use in most countries, In Japan most were used on the road, In other countries many were used by Kids just for fun off road and wound up with damaged bent frames. Though these bikes are not extinct today, these mini bikes are some of the least common of the Z50 series left running. The model has three basic sub models. The General Export (G.E.) Small headlight low exhaust supplied to Australia UK and Canada. Japanese domestic model (JDM). small headlight and high 'lunch box' exhaust and the French model's larger 5-inch headlight fitted with a yellow bulb. most of the first ones went to France and an early prototype with chromed fenders is shown on the Honda Brochures of the time. last production was 1969 and these were still available in Australia into 1970 alongside The Z50A K1 G.E.

The Honda Z50R is a motorcycle produced by Honda, in the Honda Z series family of mini bikes. It began production in 1979 as Honda's answer to the increasing demand for mini dirt bikes to be used on the track, as opposed to their traditional trail bike used more for leisure, such as the Z50A and Z50J. The Z50R quickly evolved into a light-weight mini racing motorcycle until 1999 when it was replaced by the XR50R in 2000.

The Honda Z50J refers to a popular motorcycle produced by Honda Motorcycles belonging to its Honda Z series family of mini bikes. It began production in 1973 for the European and Japanese markets. In its first few years of production, it was the same as its American counterpart, the Honda Z50A. But in 1978, when Honda dropped the Z50A from its American motorcycle lineup, the European Z50J continued to evolve until 1999. Fewer Z50J are being produced each year and are being sold only as limited editions.

The Honda SL70 Motosport, which was introduced in 1970, is a small street/trail motorcycle with a four-stroke engine, a four-speed manual gearbox, and a full-cradle frame. The bike was extremely popular with younger riders who used it off road as a trail bike and mini motocrosser. For the latter role, it was essentially replaced by Honda's XR75 in 1973.

Specifications[edit]
Year of Production: 1970–1973
Displacement: 72 cm³ (4.4 cubic inches)
Engine: 4 stroke air cooled single cylinder, single overhead cam
Ignition: Breaker points, 6 volts
Power 6.5 PS (4.8 kW) @ 9,500 rpm
Transmission:4 speed
Fuel system: Carburetor
Valves: 2 valves per cylinder
Spark Plug: NGK C7HSA

The vast majority of production of this model went to the American market. The bike was not officially sold in the UK market.

In 1970, it was designated the SL70K0, 1971 the SL70K1, 1972 the SL70K2, and 1973 the SL70K3. Except for paint colors and the addition of a speedometer, the bike was unchanged in those four years. (When first introduced, its main competition in the marketplace was the Yamaha Mini Enduro 60.) In 1974, the designation changed to XL70 and the bike got a slimmer gas tank.

The Honda CG125 is a commuter motorcycle that was made by Honda of Japan. It was in production from 1976 to 2008 and was originally manufactured in Japan, but source for European market was eventually moved to Brazil in 1985 and also Turkey for the W and M models. The CG125 is powered by a 124 cc (7.6 cu in) four-stroke, overhead valve, single-cylinder engine that has changed little over the years.

In the UK, the CG125 is popular with learners due to licensing laws which allow a rider to operate a 125 cc motorbike with L plates by completing a Compulsory Basic Training (CBT) course. It generally used by most training schools in the UK and Brazil as it is an easy bike to control and operate.

Due to its design success, several direct copies of the CG125 have sprung up (mostly from Chinese and Korean manufacturers), such as the Hongdou CG125, the Champ Commuter, the Warrior Dispatch and the Kymco Pulsar 125.

In Brazil, due to emission laws from 2009, the engine has been redesigned with an overhead camshaft (bore and stroke also changed). Due to Euro 3 emission laws the Honda CG125 has been replaced by the fuel injected CBF125 in UK and Europe since 2009.

History
The CG125 was developed from the CB125 for third world markets. There were many parts in common between the two. The two models were very similar. The main difference was in the top ends, the CB had an overhead cam. One fault with many Honda OHC engines of that era (generally denoted CB), was that they had a tendency to wear the camshaft bearings if oil changes were skipped. The CG engine was developed specifically to address this problem (amongst others) as Honda realised that riders in developing countries performed little or no preventative maintenance. To make the bike more reliable with minimal servicing, the CG125 uses overhead valves with push rod, a washable foam air filter, and fully encased chain guard.[2]

Changes
Over its lifetime, the CG125 has received numerous enhancements and tweaks:

The electrics were upgraded from 6 V to 12 V (1985 in UK)
The old contact breakers were replaced by electronic ignition (1995 in UK).
An electric start was added in 2001, originally alongside the original kick start and replacing it completely in 2004 (in the European Market).
2004 saw a number of further changes in the European market:

The front drum brake was replaced by a disc brake
A new instrument cluster, including a fuel gauge for the first time, replaced the old square unit.
The fuel capacity was increased from 12 l (2.6 imp gal; 3.2 US gal) to 13 l (2.9 imp gal; 3.4 US gal)
The styling was modernised
The chain casing was dropped in favour of a simpler chain guard
This last change is one of the very few changes that sacrificed functionality (longer chain life) in favour of aesthetics.

The Honda CB200 and CL200 Scrambler are standard and dual-sport motorcycles made from 1973 to 1979. The CB200 replaced the CB175 model and has very similar specifications. The CL200 shares many parts with the CB200 but has an upswept exhaust system to avoid off road hazards.

The CB200 has a chain driven single overhead camshaft parallel twin engine with dual carburetors and five speed gearbox. It had both an electric and kick starter. A distinguishing feature is the rubber trim down the middle of the fuel tank. Depending on where in the world the bike was sold it is known as a CB200A/CB200B or CB200K/CB200T. All CB200s had a rear drum brake. Early models (CB200A - 73 and 74) had a drum front brake, later models (CB200B - 75 and 79) had a cable operated front disc brake.

CL200 Scrambler

1974 Honda CL200
The CL200 Scrambler was a dual-sport made only in 1974, with a 198 cc (12.1 cu in) four-stroke OHC parallel twin cylinder engine mated to a 5 speed transmission. It was similar to the CB200 except the exhaust system of the Scrambler was mounted above the gearbox with both pipes on the left side of the bike, whereas on the CB200 it was mounted under the transmission gearbox on both sides of the bike. The CL exhaust pipe and heat shield were chrome.

The 1974 CL200 marked the end of the evolution of the smaller Honda twin scramblers that began with the CL160 in 1965. In 1968, the CL175 was introduced and ran a full production line until 1973. As many other motorcycles were ever increasing in size, the 1974 CL200 was introduced and marked the end of the line as it was not continued into a second year.

The Honda Sport 90, Super 90, or S90, was a 90 cc Honda motorcycle based on the Honda Super Cub, made from 1964 to 1969.

The single cylinder OHC air-cooled engine linked to a four speed transmission. It had a hand clutch, and shifting was "1 down, 3 up," with neutral in between 1st and 2nd. There was no tachometer but the speedometer indicated speed ranges for each gear. The top speed was claimed to be 64 mph, and the engine was rated at 8 horsepower.

The engine held a quart of oil and had an internal centrifugal oil filter, and the exhaust had a removable baffle. A metal cylinder behind the carburetor held the air filter. Tools went under the seat in their own compartment.

The frame was pressed steel rather than tubular steel to minimize weight and the bike was fitted with telescopic front forks for improved road holding. The motorcycle was not intended for off road use, as evidenced by the narrow handle bars and street tires; it included no accessories for such travel. 90 miles per US gallon (38 km/l) was not hard to attain, even with spirited riding.

There are a variety of models including the Honda S90, CS90, and the Benly 90. The date of manufacturing can be determined by removing the fuel tank and examining the tag surrounding the wiring harness.

 

The ZB50 is a small 50 cc motorcycle produced by Honda belonging to its Z Series family of mini bikes. The ZB50 is very similar to the Monkey-R and Monkey-RT which were marketed only in Japan in 1987 and 1988.

The ZB50 was available in 1988 in the United States, Canada and western Europe. Only 3058 were produced for the US market as the bike proved too expensive to mass-produce. The ZB50 was offered as a street & trail alternative to the Z50R, which was geared more towards dirt track riders. The ZB50 is characterized by a perimeter twin spar frame, giving it the appearance of a miniature sportbike.

Model information
The ZB50 is a street legal motorcycle, powered by a 4-stroke 49 cc overhead cam engine. Unlike the Z50R, the ZB50 engine features a roller bearing camshaft, an automatic cam chain tensioner, and a 10:1 compression ratio, NGK CR6HS spark plug.

The electrical system is 12 volt and the ignition is a solid state electronic CDI.

The carburetor has stock settings of 1-3/4 turns out for the air screw, the jet needle is set at the 3rd groove from the top, the float level is 18 mm, and it has a #75 main jet.

The transmission is 3-speed constant mesh, with a 3-up shift pattern, it uses a wet multi-plate centrifugal clutch, with the following gear ratios: 1st 3.272, 2nd 1.823, and 3rd 1.190. It has a primary reduction ratio of: 4.058, and a secondary reduction ratio of 2.6 via the chain drive (15 tooth front sprocket and 39 tooth rear sprocket).

Canadian and U.S. versions differ by the speedometer units, where Canadian speedometers use metric units, and U.S. speedometers use English units The Western-Europe versions differ, accordingly to the country they are meant for with -headlight -headlight brackets -fenders -tail -plateholder(Netherlands)

The Honda SS125A was a motorcycle manufactured by Honda from 1967 through 1969.

The SS125A was based on the Japan only Honda CS125 along with two other variants, the CD125 and the CL125, all three of which shared many common components with the CS125. The larger capacity CD175 was also similar in design, up to 1969, although with more touring-orientated styling.

Although the variants shared common components, many were unique to this range and, combined with the relatively short production run, can make spare parts difficult to obtain today. Certain items, such as silencers (mufflers) for the low slung exhaust are very rare and command a premium when sold.

In spite of its stylish appearance, the motorcycle was criticised for lack of performance, and was effectively superseded by the CB125 in 1971.

Specification
The SS125A had 17 inch wheels; the front rim was either 1.4 inches or 1.6 inches wide while the rear rim was 1.6 inches wide. The 124 cc twin cylinder engine was basically same as the earlier CA95/CB92 layout,using the left side of the engine for the timing chain to the camshaft. It used a Keihin Seiki vacuum carburettor, as opposed to the earlier engines,which were equipped with a slide valve type. The home market (Japan) version was built using a 180 degree crankshaft, as opposed to the 360 degree layout in the U.S.models.

The Honda CM125 is a parallel twin cylinder air-cooled OHC four-stroke cruiser motorcycle made by Honda from 1982 to 1986. It had a top speed of 65 mph (105 km/h). The CM125C engine combines the single carburettor of the squat Honda CD125 Benly motor with the tall cylinder head and five speed gearbox of the sportier Honda 125 Superdream.

Description
The design used popular North American cruiser styling and copied features found on larger displacement cruisers and factory custom-styling. The CM125 had high handlebars, megaphone silencers, a teardrop-shaped petrol tank and a stepped seat. More chromium-plated and polished alloy parts were found on this model than on the comparable Superdream and Benly 125 models. The quality of the chrome-plated finish was such that corrosion was a problem. The ignition lock was between the instrumentation, which consisted of two binnacles, one containing a speedometer; the other, a set of three warning lights (neutral, turn, high beam). The ignition key also activated both the steering lock and the lock on the plastic tool box located under the off-side side panel. The drum brakes were actuated by a cable in front and a rod in the rear.

The engine had a duplex camchain rather than the more common inverted-tooth type. Frame numbers started JC05-50 for the 1982-5 CM125CC and JC05-51 for the 1985-6 CM125CF. The appearance of this model, greatly enhanced by its substantial-looking twin cylinder engine, meant it enjoyed particular popularity in the United Kingdom, where learner motorcyclists are by law restricted to machines of 125 cc and below until they pass their riding test and obtain a full licence. The CM125 Custom was deleted from Honda's United Kingdom line-up in 1986. It continued to be manufactured and sold in Europe and Singapore as the CM125CN (1992, frame numbers (JC05) 5500023-5505185), CM125CP (1993, frame numbers (JC05) 5600001-5608387), CM125CR (1994-1998, frame numbers (JC05) 5700001-5999999) and CM125CX (1999, frame numbers (JH2JC05A*/JH2JC05B*) XK000001-XK099999). Its continuing popularity eventually led to another 125cc custom model being introduced, the Honda CA125 Rebel.

The Honda CD175 is a 174 cc (10.6 cu in) motorcycle made from 1967 to 1979 by the Honda Motor Company. Described by Honda as a "great new all-rounder, at home around town or putting the highway behind you", it was the touring model in Honda's 175 cc motorcycle lineup that also included the sportier CB175 and the off road CL175 version. The CD175 shared some components and design elements in common with other models from Honda including the early-model pressed steel backbone frame, sometimes known as "T bone".

It had an electric starter, except in the UK, turn signals, deeply valanced mudguards and mirrors. The inclined air-cooled engine used on earlier models was an evolutionary version of the older Honda CB160 power plant and contained some of the same components including most of the castings and some internal items.

Models
1967 models (product code 237) began at serial number CD175-1000001. Also known as the CA175, CD175A, or CD175 K0 just over 17000 of these units were built and distributed worldwide although only to commonwealth countries. Styling and appearance on these early CD models was similar to the larger CB450K0 "Black Bomber", especially the British version which received a set of low-rise handlebars (as well as no electric start and different turn signal positions).

1968 models (also product code 237) began at serial number CD175-10017136 and incorporated changes that allowed for export to the USA. These changes included a different fuel tank with larger, less pointy chrome covers and knee pads, larger more bulbous battery and tool covers, upgraded lighting and signals/switches, and a hybrid welded-tube/stamped frame. The engine remained unchanged from 1967.

1969 "K3" models (product code 302) introduced the vertical engine and all-tube frame and some smaller body work changes that continued until the end of production in 1979.

Specifications
The CD175 had a 360° crankshaft, wasted spark ignition, single carburetor, a parallel twin high revving engine, 16" wheels and a 100 mph (160 km/h) speedometer. Each connecting rod big end had roller bearings. In 1979 it was replaced by Honda CD185.

From 1967 to 1968: the machine had a 4 stroke 360 degree parallel twin; air cooled; single overhead cam (chain driven); cylinders inclined 30 degrees forward from vertical ("sloper" engine) with 9:1 compression ratio; max 17 bhp @ 10,500 rpm. From 1969 to 1979 it had a similar 4 stroke engine but with vertical cylinders ("vertical" engine); max 15 bhp @ 10,000 rpm. Both engines used a single Carburetor. Electrics were 6 volt (battery ignition).